August 11, 2016 OSL eClips (2024)

State Library eClips
* Oregon college students graduate with less debt than national average: Report
* Gov. Brown appoints new Oregon Revenue Department director
* Voters’ Pamphlet fails to unpack Measure 97 of dubious claims: Editorial — Opinion
* Parsing the pros and cons of Measure 97 means work for voters — Guest Opinion
* Measure 97 is faulty but, with legislative fixes, could work — Guest Opinion
* Immigrants make Oregon strong — Guest Opinion
* Marijuana to remain illegal under federal law, DEA says
* Lawmakers call on Congress to reform marijuana banking
* Health advisory issued at Seal Rock State Park
* Gov. Brown appoints Department of Revenue director
* South American aquatic weed is here to stay at Eugenes Delta Ponds, but city succeeds in substantially knocking it back
* Wildfire at Crater Lake National Park now completely contained
* Oregon Cultural Trust grant awardees include UO Schnitzer Museum, Cottage Grove Historical Society
* Despite best intentions of many, lots of recyclable stuff ends up in landfill
* Seniors fitter physically than previous generations
* History cant be erased — Opinion
* VA makes progress in meeting veterans needs — Guest Opinion
* Toughen timber trade deal — Opinion
* A better way — Opinion
* Transportation system needs umbrella approach — Guest Opinion
* Rating election systems — Opinion
* Report: State costs to climb by 14.3 percent
* Clock ticking on wind, solar projects
* Cover Oregon shows need for change, insider says
* City needs to work with DEQ on Terminal 1 homeless shelter
* Our Opinion: Brown wrong to back Measure 97 — Opinion
* My View: Don’t let tariff history repeat itself — Guest Opinion
* Next Oregon budget facing $1.3 billion hole
* Supply of psychiatrists shrinks
* Editorial: Fixing public records law requires more steps — Opinion
* Medical students join outcry against $1,275 exam cost
* Oregon, Union Pacific Use Microbes To Clean Up Oil Train Spill
* Owyhee Reservoir could have carryover of160,000 acre-feet
* Oregon regains jobs lost in recession, but rural areas lag
* Parties keep up pressure as Klamath dam removal proceeds
* Eagles kill hundreds of lambs each year but it goes unreported
* Oregon crops reach $5.4 billion in value
* Irrigation district seeks buy-in for Columbia River water
* Crews making progress on Gibbon Fire
* Our view: The more you know about lead — Opinion
* State seeks comments on needs of the deaf
* Our View: Rental housing crunch hits home — Opinion
* Source of high lead levels at Jackson, Roosevelt remains unknown
* Comments split over pumped-storage project
* Some Oregon crop, livestock commodities see healthy increase
* T.H.E. House does what it can, but it’s not enough
* Court leans toward allowing cormorant cull to continue
* Oregon Gets $39,000 Federal Grant to Combat Bat-Killing Disease
* After A Fraught Hearing, Terminal 1 Might Be Portland’s Largest Homeless Shelter Within Months
* A Portland Bakery Is Accused of Bilking Its Mostly Immigrant Workers
* A Rodent-Infested Lake Oswego House Could Slow Demolitions in Portland

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OREGON COLLEGE STUDENTS GRADUATE WITH LESS DEBT THAN NATIONAL AVERAGE: REPORT (Portland Oregonian)

Oregon’s college students who graduated in 2015 took on an average debt load of nearly $27,000, about 5 percent less than the national average.
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GOV. BROWN APPOINTS NEW OREGON REVENUE DEPARTMENT DIRECTOR (Portland Oregonian)

Gov. Kate Brown has appointed Nia Ray, director of the Missouri Department of Revenue, to lead the Oregon Department of Revenue.
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VOTERS’ PAMPHLET FAILS TO UNPACK MEASURE 97 OF DUBIOUS CLAIMS: EDITORIAL — OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Oregonians know to expect plenty of half-baked claims in the next several weeks about what Measure 97, a massive corporate tax proposal, would or would not do for Oregon. That’s the nature of a political campaign, especially one as controversial and contested as this measure, which seeks to significantly change the mix of taxes that underwrite public services.
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PARSING THE PROS AND CONS OF MEASURE 97 MEANS WORK FOR VOTERS — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Now that it has qualified for the ballot, there has been a predictable increase in public discourse about what is now known as Measure 97, the corporate gross receipts tax measure. This ballot measure will no doubt continue to generate intense interest, with a deluge in advertising from opposing campaigns sure to follow.
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MEASURE 97 IS FAULTY BUT, WITH LEGISLATIVE FIXES, COULD WORK — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

Measure 97, formerly known as Initiative Petition 28, is horrible policy. And I’m going to vote for it.

We’re facing unavoidable increases in Public Employees Retirement System PERS and health care-related costs. The 2017-18 Oregon general fund budget will be short between $1 billion and $2 billion.

And it gets worse in future budgets. That is simply a fact.
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IMMIGRANTS MAKE OREGON STRONG — GUEST OPINION (Portland Oregonian)

A fear of immigrants is currently sweeping across the world, and Oregon is not immune. Cynthia Kendoll’s opinion piece “Legislature should act to fight illegal-immigrant crime,” Aug. 2 falsely associates immigrants with increased crime and calls for a slate of discriminatory measures that will harm immigrants.

As an Oregonian, a mother and as the first person in my family born in this country, Kendoll’s views go against everything we stand for as Americans.
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MARIJUANA TO REMAIN ILLEGAL UNDER FEDERAL LAW, DEA SAYS (Salem Statesman Journal)

Marijuana advocates who hoped the cascade of states moving to legalize medical marijuana would soften the federal stance on the drug faced disappointment Thursday as the Drug Enforcement Administration announced it will keep marijuana illegal for any purpose.
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LAWMAKERS CALL ON CONGRESS TO REFORM MARIJUANA BANKING (Salem Statesman Journal)

The National Conference of State Legislatures on Wednesday passed a resolution urging Congress to enact laws that give legal marijuana businesses access to financial services.
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HEALTH ADVISORY ISSUED AT SEAL ROCK STATE PARK (Salem Statesman Journal)

Beachgoers are being warned to stay out of the water at Seal Rock State Park near Newport.
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GOV. BROWN APPOINTS DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE DIRECTOR (Salem Statesman Journal)

Gov. Kate Brown on Wednesday appointed Nia Ray as director of the Oregon Department of Revenue.
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SOUTH AMERICAN AQUATIC WEED IS HERE TO STAY AT EUGENES DELTA PONDS, BUT CITY SUCCEEDS IN SUBSTANTIALLY KNOCKING IT BACK (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Officials say they believe someone dumping the contents of an aquarium in the ponds started an infestation-

The city of Eugene has been successful in reducing the outbreak of a South American weed that had almost completely overrun the ponds and mud flats of the Delta Ponds park along Goodpasture Island Road, a city staffer said.

In its fourth year of fighting the weed, the city has determined that eradicating it from the ponds is an impossible goal, city ecologist Lauri Holts said. Instead, the city is content at having knocked down the plant to a manageable level that will require periodic weeding to keep it under control.

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WILDFIRE AT CRATER LAKE NATIONAL PARK NOW COMPLETELY CONTAINED (Eugene Register-Guard)

-Crews will continue to monitor fire area for several days-

A wildfire thats been burning at Crater Lake National Park for nearly two weeks was 100 percent contained as of Wednesday morning, fire officials said.

Bybee Creek Fire spokeswoman Jennifer Evans said the 1,072-acre blaze had been completely contained as of 8 p.m. Tuesday.

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OREGON CULTURAL TRUST GRANT AWARDEES INCLUDE UO SCHNITZER MUSEUM, COTTAGE GROVE HISTORICAL SOCIETY (Eugene Register-Guard)

The Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art on the University of Oregon campus and the Shelton McMurphey Johnson House in Eugene can proceed with preservation projects, thanks to grants announced Wednesday by the Oregon Cultural Trust.

Statewide, a record 149 grants totaling $2.9 million will be awarded to cultural nonprofit groups in the 2016-17 fiscal year, the trust said. Thats up 9 percent over last year, made possible by another record year of fundraising, officials said.
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DESPITE BEST INTENTIONS OF MANY, LOTS OF RECYCLABLE STUFF ENDS UP IN LANDFILL (Eugene Register-Guard)

In Lane County home to innovators such as BRING Recycling and NextStep Recycling, where certified master recyclers roam and preach, and recycling crews paw through trash left at sports games and concerts residents and businesses still toss tons of useful and reusable materials into the landfill.

Hired by county government, the California-based R3 Consulting Group recently observed significant evidence of recyclables in the waste stream at the Glenwood Central Receiving Station, the countys busiest trash transfer station.

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SENIORS FITTER PHYSICALLY THAN PREVIOUS GENERATIONS (Eugene Register-Guard)

Local seniors are reshaping the economy and working in greater numbers, and one reason why is that theyre in far better shape than previous generations, according to economic and aging experts.

Generally speaking, weve got one of the best-educated and healthy cohorts in baby boomers who are aging into what has traditionally been their retirement years, said John Tapogna, president of ECONorthwest, an economic consulting firm.
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HISTORY CANT BE ERASED — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

The University of Oregon has a legacy of racism that cannot be atoned for by changing the names of a couple of buildings. Renaming Deady Hall and Dunn Hall would amount to a token gesture, when whats required is a comprehensive reckoning with the past a reckoning that should extend beyond campus to the city of Eugene and the entire state of Oregon.
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VA MAKES PROGRESS IN MEETING VETERANS NEEDS — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

On June 5, 1972, I started working for the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. I was part of a group tasked with establishing a centralized scheduling system for medical appointments. This was the first time the VA had set standards for doctors schedules, and we found more time for appointments.

The VA was facing increased demand for care from newly discharged Vietnam veterans. And we were failing.

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TOUGHEN TIMBER TRADE DEAL — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Maybe Donald Trump ought to think about building his wall along the border between the United States and Canada better yet, make it a wooden fence. Since a softwood trade agreement between the two countries expired last year, Canada’s lumber exports to the United States have increased 43 percent, and prices have been driven down by 25 percent. Canada is able to flood the market with low-cost lumber because its wood products industry is subsidized a practice trade agreements are supposed to prevent.
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A BETTER WAY — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Springfield and Lane County are partnering on an intriguing pilot project that aims to prevent young offenders who have committed relatively minor offenses from continuing down the wrong path.

In some ways, the criminal justice system is similar to health care: Prevention is often cheaper and more effective than trying to cure a problem after it has taken root.

The Springfield Restorative Justice project is part of a growing trend that focuses on early prevention as a way of reducing long-term crime.

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TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM NEEDS UMBRELLA APPROACH — GUEST OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Right now, residents of Lane County and Oregonians across the state are traveling on outdated bridges, crumbling roads and congested highways. As our population grows, these challenges will become more difficult and more expensive to fix. Whats more, the looming Cascadia subduction zone earthquake is adding urgency to our efforts to improve key infrastructure networks.

Fortunately, Gov. Kate Brown, legislative leaders and many Oregonians agree that the next step is clear: passing a statewide transportation package in the 2017 legislative session.

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RATING ELECTION SYSTEMS — OPINION (Eugene Register-Guard)

Oregon’s voting system is rated 10th best in the nation in the latest Election Performance Index compiled by the Pew Charitable Trusts not bad, but short of the top ranking to which the state should aspire. Pews report card is imperfect, but useful all the same. It can impel the secretary of states office to improve the ranking, while Pew should refine its index to better account for the unique features of vote-by-mail systems such as Oregon’s.
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REPORT: STATE COSTS TO CLIMB BY 14.3 PERCENT (Portland Tribune)

-The projections include a $1.35 billion shortfall-

The cost to maintain existing state services in the next two years will climb by 14.3 percent, or $2.7 billion, according to budget projections released Wednesday.

The state faces an estimated budget shortfall of $1.35 billion, according to the report by the Legislative Fiscal Office and Department of Administrative Services. Personnel and pensions, the states increasing share of the cost of the Affordable Care Act, rising human services caseloads and inflation are driving the costs, the report states.
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CLOCK TICKING ON WIND, SOLAR PROJECTS (Portland Tribune)

Extended federal tax breaks and Oregon’s new law to replace coal with renewable energy have combined to put new pressure on local electric utilities to procure more wind and solar power.

Portland General Electric PGE and Pacific Power, the two largest electricity suppliers in Oregon, are scrambling to meet the states higher renewable energy mandates and take advantage of federal tax breaks before they expire.

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COVER OREGON SHOWS NEED FOR CHANGE, INSIDER SAYS (Portland Tribune)

Take a week off, wade through thousands of pages of court filings in Oregon’s long-running court battle with software giant Oracle, and you still wont have the real story of how Cover Oregon failed and wasted more than $300 million, according to Tom Walsh, a longtime technology specialist and veteran of the project.
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CITY NEEDS TO WORK WITH DEQ ON TERMINAL 1 HOMELESS SHELTER (Portland Tribune)

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality has written the City of Portland to say the warehouse at Terminal 1 is not approved for a homeless shelter, as proposed by Commissioner Dan Saltzman.

The Aug. 8 letters from DEQ Project Engineer Erin McDonnell says her agency assumed the property would remain industrial when the Port of Portland sold it to the Bureau of Environmental Service. It was cleaned up to industrial but not residential standards at the time.

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OUR OPINION: BROWN WRONG TO BACK MEASURE 97 — OPINION (Portland Tribune)

Oregon’s long-running game of Wait for Kate came to a sudden but all-too-predictable and disappointing end last week. On Thursday, Gov. Kate Brown announced shes backing Measure 97, the largest tax increase in Oregon’s history.

We weren’t surprised, but the news was disheartening.
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MY VIEW: DON’T LET TARIFF HISTORY REPEAT ITSELF — GUEST OPINION (Portland Tribune)

Thirty years ago, Hollywood immortalized Oregon’s most ignominious contribution to the world economy.

In the 1986 movie Ferris Buellers Day Off, a hapless high school economics teacher pleadingly asks his students, If anyone … anyone had ever heard of the 1930 Hawley-Smoot Tariff Act.

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NEXT OREGON BUDGET FACING $1.3 BILLION HOLE (Bend Bulletin)

-Preliminary projections released for 2017-19-

Oregon’s bills are set to grow by $2.7 billion in the next two-year cycle, state economists said Wednesday, a more than 14 percent growth over the 2015-17 budget.

But there will be only about half as much added revenue available to pay the higher bills, and the economists project Oregon lawmakers will grapple with a $1.35 billion shortfall.
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SUPPLY OF PSYCHIATRISTS SHRINKS (Bend Bulletin)

-Lack of doctors creates access problem in U.S., Oregon-

Mental health parity laws passed in 2008 require insurance companies to treat mental illness the same way they treat medical conditions. But a dwindling supply of psychiatrists both nationwide and in Oregon is leaving many patients with complex mental health issues without timely access to psychiatric care.
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EDITORIAL: FIXING PUBLIC RECORDS LAW REQUIRES MORE STEPS — OPINION (Bend Bulletin)

The state of Oregon released an audit last year looking into problems with the states public records law. It recommended the state should not adopt deadlines for responses to record requests.

We found no evidence in Oregon or other states, to suggest that implementing a deadline in law would speed up an agency’s response, the audit said.

On Friday, Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum proposed a first step in changes to the law: deadlines.
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MEDICAL STUDENTS JOIN OUTCRY AGAINST $1,275 EXAM COST (Bend Bulletin)

Hundreds of medical students at the University of Maryland, Georgetown University, Johns Hopkins University and George Washington University are joining a nationwide campaign to eliminate a standardized licensing test they say is redundant and a financial burden.

Ed. Note: Quote from executive director of the Oregon Medical Board near bottom of story.
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OREGON, UNION PACIFIC USE MICROBES TO CLEAN UP OIL TRAIN SPILL (Oregon Public Broadcasting)

Oil that spilled from a derailed train in the Columbia River Gorge in June contaminated nearby groundwater. Starting in the next week, Union Pacific Railroad will be working with Oregon’s Department of Environmental Quality to clean it up.
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OWYHEE RESERVOIR COULD HAVE CARRYOVER OF 160,000 ACRE-FEET (Capital Press)

here could be as much as 160,000 acre-feet of carryover water left in the Owyhee Reservoir when the 2016 irrigation season ends.
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OREGON REGAINS JOBS LOST IN RECESSION, BUT RURAL AREAS LAG (Capital Press)

A state economist says five of Oregon’s nine regional economies, paced by Portland, have regained all the jobs lost in the recession and are all-time highs in terms of employment.
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PARTIES KEEP UP PRESSURE AS KLAMATH DAM REMOVAL PROCEEDS (Capital Press)

Both sides in the debate over removing four dams from the Klamath River are keeping the pressure on as the project moves forward.

The Hoopa Valley Tribe is suing federal agencies to improve flows in the lower Klamath River for endangered coho salmon a goal that proponents say could be achieved if the dams came out.
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EAGLES KILL HUNDREDS OF LAMBS EACH YEAR BUT IT GOES UNREPORTED (Capital Press)

Laura Wahl stands in the pasture with her lambs eight hours a day during peak lambing season to protect them.

The predators arent coyotes or cougars; they are bald eagles.

Wahl runs Wahl Grazing, a sheep and goat operation, with her family near Albany, Ore. She estimates that she loses 300 lambs a year to eagle depredation a loss of approximately $37,500.

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OREGON CROPS REACH $5.4 BILLION IN VALUE (Capital Press)

Cattle and calves, followed by greenhouse and nursery plants, again paced Oregon crop values in 2015, the state ag department reported.

Preliminary figures assembled by USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service show the state with a crop value of $5.4 billion in 2015, similar to the previous two years, Oregon Department of Agriculture spokesman Bruce Pokarney said in a news release.

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IRRIGATION DISTRICT SEEKS BUY-IN FOR COLUMBIA RIVER WATER (East Oregonian)

The first project seeking to capitalize on new mitigated irrigation water from the Columbia River is taking shape, though its success will ultimately hinge on whether enough farmers buy into the plan.

Its a complicated scenario with many moving parts, but the basic framework would allow patrons of the Westland Irrigation District to buy additional water supplies in order to grow more high-value crops such as potatoes and onions.
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CREWS MAKING PROGRESS ON GIBBON FIRE (East Oregonian)

The Gibbon Fire, burning in the Blue Mountains east of Pendleton, is now 20 percent contained as crews worked Tuesday to strengthen fire lines.

Lightning touched off the blaze earlier this week, and it has since increased to 194 acres near Meacham Creek and Stumbough Ridge.
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OUR VIEW: THE MORE YOU KNOW ABOUT LEAD — OPINION (East Oregonian)

Local school districts deserve credit for taking the initiative and testing preemptively for lead in their water.

In Hermiston and all throughout the InterMountain Education Service District, schools have taken samples and are learning what all comes out of their faucets whether regularly used for drinking or not when they turn on the tap.

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STATE SEEKS COMMENTS ON NEEDS OF THE DEAF (Medford Mail Tribune)

The state of Oregon is conducting a community needs assessment for the deaf and people with hearing loss. An online survey has been set up to take comments and two sessions are being held in the Rogue Valley this week on the topic.

According to a release, the state wants to learn more about the needs among those with hearing loss, including hearing loss experiences and barriers to services.
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OUR VIEW: RENTAL HOUSING CRUNCH HITS HOME — OPINION (Medford Mail Tribune)

An Ashland couple forced to move by the impending sale of their rental house are discovering just how difficult it can be to find housing in an area with a vacancy rate under 2 percent and rents on the rise. What makes their situation notable is that Jason and Vanessa Houk have made it their life’s work to help those who don’t have housing or enough to eat.
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SOURCE OF HIGH LEAD LEVELS AT JACKSON, ROOSEVELT REMAINS UNKNOWN (Medford Mail Tribune)

-New tests show low levels, Medford district says-

Medford School District officials are still trying to determine the source of high lead levels found in the water at Jackson and Roosevelt elementary schools three weeks ago.

Last week, the Medford Water Commission pulled out the meters at both schools and drew samples from the service line between the meter and the water main. Of the 32 samples taken at Jackson and the 26 samples taken at Roosevelt, they submitted a total of 23 to Neilson Research Corp. for analysis and then replaced the meters at both schools with newer, more accurate meters.
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COMMENTS SPLIT OVER PUMPED-STORAGE PROJECT (Herald and News)

Job creation butted up against preservation of Native American sites at the first of two hearings to license a pumped-storage electric generating facility about 11 miles northeast of Klamath Falls.

About 90 people attended Tuesday nights public comment session at Oregon Tech held by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.

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SOME OREGON CROP, LIVESTOCK COMMODITIES SEE HEALTHY INCREASE (Herald and News)

While Oregon agriculture’s overall growth curve has slowed down in recent years, certain crops and livestock commodities have enjoyed a healthy increase in production value over the past decade. In fact, only one commodity in the top 20 has recorded a decrease over the 10 year period and that drop is very small, according to a report from the Oregon Department of Agriculture.
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T.H.E. HOUSE DOES WHAT IT CAN, BUT IT’S NOT ENOUGH (The World)

A homeless shelter in Coos Bay is the only haven for some people with mental illness, physical ailments or a criminal record any of which can exclude them from other refuges.

But Leslie Lintner, director of T.H.E. House, would like to see the community step up and create transitional housing for vulnerable people.
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COURT LEANS TOWARD ALLOWING CORMORANT CULL TO CONTINUE (Daily Astorian)

Saying that double-crested cormorants are not an endangered or threatened species, but that many of the salmon and steelhead they feast on in the Lower Columbia River estuary are, U.S. District Court Judge Michael H. Simons tentative ruling would allow the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to continue culling cormorants in the estuary.
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OREGON GETS $39,000 FEDERAL GRANT TO COMBAT BAT-KILLING DISEASE (Willamette Week)

-The money will go to diagnostics for white-nose syndrome, a disease that’s killed more than 6 million bats.-

Federal officials are worried about Oregon’s wildlife. Specifically, our bats.
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AFTER A FRAUGHT HEARING, TERMINAL 1 MIGHT BE PORTLAND’S LARGEST HOMELESS SHELTER WITHIN MONTHS (Portland Mercury)

For all the remarkable things about the debate over Northwest Portland’s Terminal 1, the most striking may be how it’s scrambled the long-drawn battle lines we’re used to when it comes to Portland’s homeless.

It’s partly the lack of certitude or concrete specifics inherent in the proposal to put a 400-person temporary shelter on the 14.5-acre plot of city-owned land. And it’s the immensity of a 1,000-plus person “campus” that could follow in coming years.
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A PORTLAND BAKERY IS ACCUSED OF BILKING ITS MOSTLY IMMIGRANT WORKERS (Portland Mercury)

-The Case Could Have a Major Impact on Manufacturing in Oregon-

Portland labor lawyers have filed an aggressive and potentially precedent-setting class-action lawsuit against a Portland baked goods manufacturer, alleging the company overworked its production line employees many of whom are vulnerable immigrants and refugees with limited English skills, they said and bilked them out of overtime pay.

The suit which seeks both daily and weekly overtime pay for workers is unheard of in Oregon, and could have a major impact on the manufacturing industry in the state.
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A RODENT-INFESTED LAKE OSWEGO HOUSE COULD SLOW DEMOLITIONS IN PORTLAND (Portland Mercury)

-But in This Market, It Might Not Matter-

The old fire station passed out of existence without much fanfare, but with stunning speed.

It was late 2013, and the 89-year-old building near NE MLK and Alberta was at the end of its utility to a booming market. It was time, its owner had decided, for demolition.

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August 11, 2016 OSL eClips (2024)

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